The height of whale watching season has just begun in Western Australia. The Indian Ocean and Southern Ocean coastlines of Western Australia are home to one of of the longest whale watching seasons in the world. These are also some of the most isolated coastlines, which gives you an amazing opportunity to see these magnificent creatures of the deep up close and personal. The height of whale watching season in Western Australia is from May through September. However, something unique to Western Australia is that if you know where to look (and most of the expert whale watching charter companies do), then you can seek out and find different whales on year long; more on that later. Continue reading

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This is part three in our series featuring the top 20 most Instagrammable places in Australia. We have covered places in New South Wales, Victoria, and Queensland in our first two blogs on this series. As you have seen, Australia’s scenery is vast and picturesque. There are so many beautiful and awesome places. Earlier this week, we featured part one of our most instagrammed places in Australia that included the Sydney Harbour, Bondi Beach, Taronga Zoo, Cape Byron Lighthouse, Darling Harbour, Jenolan Caves, St Kilda Beach, National Gallery of Victoria, The Twelve Apostles, and the Puffing Billy Railway. In part two, we featured the next 6 places on our list, all were in Queensland: the Great Barrier Reef, South Bank, Whitehaven Beach, Hamilton Island, Fraser Island, and Surfers Paradise. Here are our last four of the most Instagrammed places in Australia (also in no particular order). Continue reading

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You may not associate snorkelling with Sydney, but there is some world class snorkelling right in Sydney that will fulfill your need for adventures with a mask and fins. No need to travel far and wide, clear waters and unique marine life awaits you right off of the coast and beaches of Sydney. Here are seven places you should definitely check out and plan a snorkel and see adventure soon. Continue reading

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Kanangra-Boyd National Park is located just south west of the Blue Mountains. It is just about a 3 hour drive from Sydney and it is a scenic drive through the Blue Mountains to get to this park. It is located 180 km south west of Sydney. This protected park along with seven other national parks all make up the UNESCO World Heritage listed Greater Blue Mountains Area. We have been featuring the national parks in the region north of Sydney in New South Wales including the Greater Blue Mountains Area National Parks as well as other national parks in the region.  We featured Berowra Valley National Park, Marramarra National Park, and Dharug National Park  and Yengo National Park. Previously, we highlighted several other National Parks in this region including Blue Mountains National Park, Ku-ring-ga National Park, Royal National Park and Wollemi National Park.  Today, we are featuring Kanangra-Boyd National Park, which is one of the larger national parks in the region at 68,660 hectares. It forms part of the Great Dividing Range and housed within the borders of this national park are some amazing features including three waterfall systems, karst caves, Kanangra Walls, Mount Colong, and Thurat Spires. Continue reading

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Garig Gunak Barlu National Park is located on the Cobourg Peninsula. The surrounding waters including the Aratura Sea and the Van Diemen Gulf as well as some of the nearshore islands are also included under the protected status of the National Park. It is located about 214 km northeast of Darwin, the capital city of the Northern Territory. This is one of the most northern places in Australia and holds the top position of the Northern Territory’s Top End. Although it has a long and rich Aboriginal history and culture, it is mostly uninhabited today. As you can see from the map, the Cobourg Peninsula is very indented with coves, bays, inlets and waterways. Most of everything to do with the peninsula has to do with the sea and surrounding waterways. Tourism is the main attraction to Garig Gunak Barlu National Park. The remoteness is part of the appeal, but so is the beautiful, tropical turquoise waters and warm climate. You will need a permit  to travel through the national park as it is Arnhem Land. You will also need a permit  if you plan to camp in the park. Permits are easy to obtain, you just have to get them ahead of time. The access to the park is via 4WD only and only during the dry season from May through October, but the best time to place a trip here is between May and August. During the wet season, as with most of the Top End of the Northern Territory, roads may be impassable and flooding is likely. Visitors to Garig Gunak Barlu National Park should be completely self-sustainable. Since this area is so remote, you should carry emergency supplies and extra petrol with you. Fuel is available at Jabiru but you will not be able to buy any fuel within the park. Continue reading

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Many of Australia’s cities are being hailed from all over the world as some of the best destinations for food and wine aficionados. If you love food and wine, here are some of the top Australian destinations that should be on your holiday agenda. All across the country, you can find good eats pretty much anywhere you go. A wide variety of produce is grown all over and in different climates. Beef and lamb are raised and, as a result, Australia has one of the highest meat consumptions in the world. Fish, like barramundi and other seafood is, of course, very popular since the country is a continent and the oceans are never too far away. International cuisine has also taken a foothold in most cities’ dining scenes with many world renowned chefs setting up shop. Pavlova is Australia’s most favourite dessert, but if you want an edible souvenir, Tim Tam varieties of sandwich cookies are a sure bet. Wine plays a big part of the foodie scene in Australia and is a big business too. The wine industry has been going strong in Australia since the 1950’s. Since the country has so many different types of soil and varying climates, it is able to support over 100 varieties of grapes. Another drink you may not realise is very popular in Australia is coffee. In fact, Australians are very serious about their coffee. Tea is also popular because of so much British influence; however, “teatime” in Australia doesn’t always necessarily mean drinking tea, rather “Morning Tea” and “Afternoon Tea” are more like light snacks in between meals. As you can see, no matter where you go in Australia, you are likely to have some delectable culinary delights to choose from. Here are some other foodie adventures to think about when travelling throughout Australia: Continue reading

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The surrounds of Perth are unique because there is so much protected land around this growing city and greater metropolitan area. Perth is the capital of Western Australia and it is one of Australia’s fastest growing cities. Surrounding the growing metropolis are 15 national parks, 7 regional parks, 3 marine parks, and 3 nature reserves; plus an interesting mix of forest land, caves, and coastline. In our first blog post about National Parks near Perth, we visited Avon Valley National Park, John Forrest National Park, Serpentine National Park, Yanchep National Park, and Beelu National Park. Our second blog post on national parks near Perth  included a closer look at Walyunga National Park, Yalgorup National Park, Wandoo National Park, Kalamunda National Park, and Greenmount National Park. Our 3rd series featured the last five national parks in the surrounding region of Perth including Korung National Park, Midgegooroo National Park, Gooseberry Hill National Park, Helena National Park, and Neerabup National Park. Next up, are the Regional Parks surrounding Perth. This blog features Beeliar Regional Park, Canning River Regional Park, Herdsman Lake Regional Park, and Yellagonga Regional Park. Continue reading

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The surrounds of Perth are unique because there is so much protected land around this growing city and greater metropolitan area. Perth is the capital of Western Australia and it is one of Australia’s fastest growing cities. Surrounding the growing metropolis are 15 national parks, 7 regional parks, 3 marine parks, and 3 nature reserves; plus an interesting mix of forest land, caves, and coastline. In our first blog post about National Parks near Perth, we visited Avon Valley National Park, John Forrest National Park, Serpentine National Park, Yanchep National Park, and Beelu National Park. Our second blog post on national parks near Perth  included a closer look at Walyunga National Park, Yalgorup National Park, Wandoo National Park, Kalamunda National Park, and Greenmount National Park. Come with us again as we explore five more national parks in the surround region of Perth including Korung National Park, Midgegooroo National Park, Gooseberry Hill National Park, Helena National Park, and Neerabup National Park. These national parks highlight the natural surrounds of metropolitan Perth including the Perth Hills, caves, forests, and walking trails in Perth’s surrounds. Continue reading

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We just finished up our series highlighting the 9 Great Walks of Australia. We showed you what it’s like to trek through each of these walks. Hopefully, you will consider one of them when you are in that region of Australia next. Nine different walks was a lot of ground to cover, so we wanted to give you a recap of all 9 walks to make it easier to compare and choose which walk might be right for your next bushwalking holiday. The nine Great Walks of Australia are: Continue reading

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The Arkaba Walk is one of South Australia’s great adventures. This overland walking safari is in an awesome setting of the Flinders Ranges near the Elder Range and Wilpena Pound. Arkaba is made up of 60,000 acres of private conservancy. This is how you explore the outback by bushwalking on this four day guided tour. You will see why the Arkaba Walk is listed as one of the Great Walks of Australia and learn about this region’s 600 million year old geological history that created the spectacular panoramic views. The walks are exclusive and limited to a group of 10. Arkaba’s tour guides are passionate about this region and love sharing the bush and its stories with guests. Continue reading

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