On the heels of Shark Week, the message is clear: we must protect the sharks in our oceans or suffer the consequences of the imbalance in nature. That prompted me to look to see how many of the growing shark sanctuaries around the world has been established in Australia. Actually, I thought that I would find several. Sadly, I found none. While there are wildlife sanctuaries and marine parks, there are no sanctuaries implicitly set up for sharks. There is a movement to make Shark Bay in Western Australia a shark sanctuary,  but for now, we will have to hope that the protections of the marine wildlife sanctuary is enough to help keep the many species of sharks here safe from human dangers. People who are so afraid of shark attacks forget that we are entering their domain and even in their own domain, humans kill millions more sharks than the other way around. Today, I hope to show you the beauty of Shark Bay and Faure Island and you will see why they are protected wildlife sanctuaries. In fact, it is a World Heritage Area. Hopefully you will plan a trip there in the near future. Continue reading

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We previously told you about all of the walking tracks in Brisbane Water National Park.  Today, we will be highlighting the lookouts, biking trails, picnic spots, and exploring Aboriginal culture and history of the park. It is 11,506 hectares and located 27 km north of Sydney. It takes about 1 ½ hours to drive to the park from Sydney’s CBD. Brisbane Water National Park is located in the Central Coast region of New South Wales. We have been featuring the national parks in the region north of Sydney in New South Wales including the Greater Blue Mountains Area National Parks as well as other national parks in the region.  We featured Berowra Valley National Park, Marramarra National Park, Dharug National Park,  Yengo National Park, Kanangra-Boyd National Park, Nattai National Park, Gardens of Stone National Park, and Thirlmere Lakes National Park.  Previously, we highlighted several other National Parks in this region including Blue Mountains National Park, Ku-ring-ga National Park, Royal National Park and Wollemi National Park. There are so many national parks in this region close to Sydney, some are part of the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage-listed area and some are not. Visiting a national park helps contribute to their protection and is an excellent way to be able to enjoy the Australian wilderness. Today’s focus is on the different things to do in Brisbane Water National Park like the scenic lookouts, biking trails, picnic spots, and the Aboriginal art in the park. Continue reading

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We have been featuring things to do in Australia during the winter time. Winter in Australia is filled with festivals that make for great things to do on holiday or just with friends all over the country. We told you about some of the winter festivals in our feature on Things to Do in Australia in Winter, but now we will go into more detail about upcoming festivals still happening this winter. Continue reading

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Last week we did a feature on things to do in Australia in winter and we highlighted five different things to do including relaxing in Noosa, Kakadu National Park, winter festivals, whale watching in Hervey Bay and skiing in the mountains. Today, we have 5 more things to do in Australia in winter: Christmas in July, The Great Barrier Reef, Hobart, Swimming with Whale Sharks, and a Top End Road Trip. Continue reading

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Visiting Australia in the winter is a great time because of the varying temperatures, different options, and variety of festivals available. Depending on where you decide to travel, you can experience the tropics in the north, the mountains in the southeast, the Great Barrier Reef and whale watching along the coasts. If you plan for a road trip, you can get to see a little bit of everything. Here are 5 things to do in Australia this winter. Continue reading

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In the past, we featured many of the National Parks of NSW near Sydney. One of the national parks there with the most to see and do is Yengo National Park. First, we featured the campgrounds and accommodations in Yengo National Park. Then, we focused on the walking trails and lookouts in Yengo National Park. We previously told you all about Berowra Valley National Park, Marramarra National Park, Kanangra-Boyd National Park, Gardens of Stone National Park, Thirlmere Lakes National Park, Brisbane Water National Park, and Dharug National Park. We also just did a feature on the Nature in Nattai National Park. Yengo National Park is adjacent to Dharug National Park directly to the east and in the Lower Hunter region of New South Wales. Yengo National Park is located about 85 km northwest of Sydney’s CBD. It takes about 2 hours to drive there from Sydney. The park is vast, covering 154,328 hectares of land. This protected park along with seven other national parks all make up the UNESCO World Heritage listed Greater Blue Mountains Area. Yengo National Park features walking trails, campgrounds, accommodations, cycle trails, bushwalking, horseback riding, bird watching, panoramic lookouts, scenic drives, and Aboriginal cultural heritage sites. This is part three of our blog series on Yengo National Park. In part one, we highlighted the places to stay in Yengo National Park: The Big Yango House and the four different campgrounds in Yengo National Park plus the Big Yango House. The campgrounds are Mogo campground, Finchley campground, Mountain Arm campground, and Blue Gums campground. In part two, we explored the walking trails and picturesque lookouts available inside Yengo National Park. Today, we will be exploring the bike trails and scenic four wheel drives in the park. Continue reading

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Now is the time to start planning your next road trip through the Northern Territory. It is only passable during the dry season, which is the winter. Nature’s Way is a rugged and remote, adventurous road trip through the Top End of Australia’s Northern Territory. The name says it all, this journey really helps you get in touch with the beautiful nature here in one of the most  untouched places in the world. The road trip is a triangle including Darwin through the Adelaide and Mary River wetlands, parts of the gigantic Kakadu National Park and the magnificent landscapes of Litchfield National Park. If you are not familiar with Australia’s climate, it is important that you understand that the north is tropical and it is hot and humid, even during the winter dry season.  The whole Top End of Australia gets warmer and more humid the further north you go. Be sure to dress appropriately and still drink plenty of water; the humidity can be deceiving. Our blog today will be covering a 7 day itinerary of a possible holiday journey that is part on land and part cruise. Continue reading

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Nattai National Park is located south of the Blue Mountains and is adjacent to Kanangra-Boyd National Park  which we have featured before. It is just a 1 ½ hour to 2 hour drive from Sydney. It is located 150 km south west of Sydney. This protected park along with seven other national parks all make up the UNESCO World Heritage listed Greater Blue Mountains Area. We previously featured some of the national parks in the region north of Sydney in New South Wales including the Greater Blue Mountains Area National Parks as well as other national parks in the region.  We featured Berowra Valley National Park, Marramarra National Park, and Dharug National Park  and Yengo National Park. Previously, we highlighted several other National Parks in this region including Blue Mountains National Park, Ku-ring-ga National Park, Royal National Park, Brisbane Water National Park, Gardens of Stone National Park, and Wollemi National Park.  Today, we are featuring Nattai National Park. Visiting a national park helps contribute to their protection and is an excellent way to be able to enjoy the Australian wilderness. Nattai National Park includes the Nattai River, the Little River, Allum River and the Wollondilly River, the dramatic Hawkesbury sandstone cliffs, Mount Jellore and is heavily forested. Even though it is this close to Sydney, it is one of the more remote national parks and is not as well visited as many of the other national parks of this region. If you are into remote wilderness exploration, then Nattai National Park is for you. While there, you can also visit the Nattai State Conservation Area, the Burragorang State Conservation Area, Lake Burragorang, the Bargo State Conservation Area, the Wombeyan Caves, and the Yerranderie State Conservation Area. Continue reading

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An Australian road trip is a very exciting holiday for the entire family. However, the idea of a road trip with the kids can be quite daunting. These tips and tricks in our road trip with kids survival guide will help you be prepared and keep them occupied so that everyone has a great road trip holiday. Preparing ahead of time is key. Before doing anything, check out our Long Distance Road Trip Checklist. If you are planning to hire a car for the road trip, then this might help you decide: Which is the Best Rental Car for You. Lastly, you might want to get some packing tips on How to Pack Less and Travel Light. You will see that many of our tips are about preparing ahead of time. Continue reading

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The height of whale watching season has just begun in Western Australia. The Indian Ocean and Southern Ocean coastlines of Western Australia are home to one of of the longest whale watching seasons in the world. These are also some of the most isolated coastlines, which gives you an amazing opportunity to see these magnificent creatures of the deep up close and personal. The height of whale watching season in Western Australia is from May through September. However, something unique to Western Australia is that if you know where to look (and most of the expert whale watching charter companies do), then you can seek out and find different whales on year long; more on that later. Continue reading

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