There is always something to do in Australia and it is easy to find all different kinds of events and festivals happening everywhere all the time. We already told you about upcoming festivals and events in New South Wales, Western Australia, and Queensland part one and Queensland Festivals part two. Today we are featuring some of the festivals and events that are coming up in Victoria including the Melbourne Jazz Festival, Great Ocean Road Running Festival, the High Country Harvest, Van Gogh and the Seasons at the National Gallery of Victoria, and the Chevrolet Brasil Global Tour Match 1. Add these great events to your social calendar now! Here’s a little bit about each: Continue reading

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+

Earlier this week, we featured part one of our top autumn destinations in Australia. We featured the Adelaide Hills, the Yarra Valley, Cradle Mountain, and the Margaret River Region. The colours and the weather are a winning combination! You may not even realise that you can find some picturesque and amazing Autumn colour scenes in Australia. Get your rental car ready and head out to some of these beautiful places between March and May. Today, we are featuring Melbourne and Bright Victoria, the Hunter Valley and Orange in New South Wales, and Litchfield National Park. Continue reading

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+

Australia’s scenery is vast and magnificent. There are no shortage of beautiful locations just waiting for you and your camera. Earlier this week, we featured part one of our most instagrammed places in Australia that included the Sydney Harbour, Bondi Beach, Taronga Zoo, Cape Byron Lighthouse, Darling Harbour, Jenolan Caves, St Kilda Beach, National Gallery of Victoria, The Twelve Apostles, and the Puffing Billy Railway. For this part of our series, we are featuring the most Instagrammed places in Queensland Here are 6 more of the most Instagrammed places in Queensland, Australia (also in no particular order). Continue reading

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+

When you are looking for the most scenic places, Australia does not disappoint and there is no shortage of beautiful scenery. As you will see from the most Instagrammed places in Australia, that there is also a big variety in the different types of beauty our country has to offer. Here are 10 of the most Instagrammed places in Australia (in no particular order). Continue reading

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+

There are so many different places to visit and things to do while on holiday in Australia. There is something for everyone, but if you like lists, we have compiled some of the best Australian travel destinations with the help of AustralianTraveller.com. Read on to find some of the winners of their people’s choice awards for best food and wine region, best outback adventure, best historical site, most scenic road trip, best walk, best annual festival, and best guided tour. In part one, we covered the first four destinations on our list. Now, for part two, will be covering the three best travel destinations from our list that all happen to be in or near Sydney. Continue reading

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+

You may not associate snorkelling with Sydney, but there is some world class snorkelling right in Sydney that will fulfill your need for adventures with a mask and fins. No need to travel far and wide, clear waters and unique marine life awaits you right off of the coast and beaches of Sydney. Here are seven places you should definitely check out and plan a snorkel and see adventure soon. Continue reading

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+

This is part two of our blog series all about the Bicentennial National Trail. In part one, we covered the northern part of the trail, sections 1 through 6 that take you from the Far North of Queensland in Cooktown to the Queensland and New South Wales Border. If you are into long distance trekking, then you should consider The Bicentennial National Trail for your next holiday adventure. Originally known as the National Horse Trail, the Bicentennial National Trail is a challenging hike stretching over 5,330 km from Cooktown, Queensland through New South Wales, the ACT, and ending in Healesville, Victoria near Melbourne. The trail was originally intended for horses, and is now one of the longest non-motorised trails in the world. It is classified as multi-use, so horses are still used on the trail as well as bicycling and walking. In fact, the entire length of the trail is not yet suitable for hiking and cycling, so use caution and obey all signs. The trail is rugged and passes through the Great Dividing Range, several national parks, private property and wilderness areas. The trail’s concept was developed by legendary Australian bushman, RM WIlliams and the route was first blazed by Danny Seymour in 1972 with his horses named Smokey and Dino and his cattle dog, Bluedog. The Australian Trail Horse Riders Association (ATHRA) was formed that same year, and the group helped to develop a plan to map out the trail from the Far North of Queensland down the eastern seaboard. The trail uses old coach roads, stock routes, brumby tracks, rivers, and fire trails. The trail is separated into 12 sections and there is a Guidebook for each section. You must have the Guidebooks in order to follow the trail. Today, we are continuing south on our journey through sections seven to twelve starting from where we left off at the border between Queensland and New South Wales heading south through New South Wales, the ACT, and into Victoria down to the southern coast. Continue reading

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+

If you are into long distance trekking, then you should consider The Bicentennial National Trail for your next holiday adventure. Originally known as the National Horse Trail, the Bicentennial National Trail is a challenging hike stretching over 5,330 km from Cooktown, Queensland through New South Wales, the ACT, and ending in Healesville, Victoria near Melbourne. The trail was originally intended for horses, and is now one of the longest non-motorised trails in the world. It is classified as multi-use, so horses are still used on the trail as well as bicycling and walking. In fact, the entire length of the trail is not yet suitable for hiking and cycling; so use caution and obey all signs. The trail is rugged and passes through the Great Dividing Range, several national parks, private property and wilderness areas. The trail’s concept was developed by legendary Australian bushman, RM WIlliams and the route was first blazed by Danny Seymour in 1972 with his horses named Smokey and Dino and his cattle dog, Bluedog. The Australian Trail Horse Riders Association (ATHRA) was formed that same year, and the group helped to develop a plan to map out the trail from the Far North of Queensland down the eastern seaboard. The trail uses old coach roads, stock routes, brumby tracks, rivers, and fire trails. The trail is separated into 12 sections and there is a Guidebook for each section. You must have the Guidebooks in order to follow the trail. In part one of our blog coverage today, we will be covering sections one through six beginning in the north at Cooktown. Continue reading

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+

The Three Capes Track is located in Tasmania on the Tasman Peninsula. This is close to the capital city of Hobart in the southeast corner of the island state. It is one of the furthest points south in Australia. The Three Capes Track walk is a multi-day walk. It is a 4 day and 3 night adventure through this rugged and wild land. The beautiful and astonishing landscapes you will see include land in Tasman National Park; and the three capes of the namesake are Cape Pillar, Cape Hauy, and Cape Raoul. The scenery includes tall eucalypt forests, coastal heath, and Australia’s highest sea cliffs. Continue reading

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+

Visiting cellar doors or cellar door hopping is one of the latest trends in Australian travel. There is something to be said about quaint, smaller wineries that aren’t associated with a big brand name. You will find hospitality and a friendly, family vibe at some of the smaller cellar doors you visit. Even if wine tasting isn’t your thing, there are other delights including gardens, historic buildings, local culture, and plenty of good eats. Here are five cellar doors to add to your list when travelling suggested by our friends over at AustralianTraveller.com: Continue reading

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+