We just wrapped up a seven part series on the National Parks and nature parks near Perth. Now we are heading away from Perth but still staying in Western Australia to explore some of the more remote National Parks in the state. First up on our list is Stirling Range National Park in the southwest corner of Western Australia.

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Stirling Range National Park Photo Credit: Parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au

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Stirling Range National Park Photo Credit: Parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au

About Stirling Range National Park

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Stirling Range National Park Photo Credit: Parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au

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Stirling Range National Park Photo Credit: Parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au

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Stirling Range National Park Photo Credit: Parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au

Stirling Range National Park is home to the only major mountain range in the southern half of Western Australia. The Stirling Ranges are known to the Aboriginal people as Koi Kyenunu-ruff. The name translates to ‘mist rolling around the mountains’, which is a pretty accurate description of what you can see here frequently. Stirling Range is one of the few places where snow can fall occasionally, so mountain hikers should always be prepared for changing weather. The towering peaks of the Stirling Range stand at over 1000 metres above sea level and offer up panoramic views of the park and beyond. The scenery includes rugged cliffs, sheltered gullies, and an amazing array of colourful wildflowers. There are over 1500 species of flora in the park, many of which cannot be found anywhere else on Earth.

Hiking in Stirling Range National Park

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Stirling Range National Park Photo Credit: Parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au

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Stirling Range National Park Photo Credit: Parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au

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Stirling Range National Park Photo Credit: Parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au

When it comes to hiking, bushwalking or taking nature walks in Australia (even in national parks), it is so important to be well prepared and do your research about the requirements and details of the walk you choose. No matter the length of your walk, be sure to plan ahead, understand the fitness level requirements, have the right shoes and attire, bring plenty of drinking water, have emergency supplies with you, and make sure that someone not travelling with you knows when you are expected back. When you take all these necessary safety precautions, it ensures that you will have the most enjoyable time exploring the far reaches of this part of the world. It is also important to always remember that you are a guest in nature and National Parks are all protected for a reason. Bring a bag with you to take your own rubbish away. Leave nothing but footprints and take nothing but pictures. Here is a little bit about each of the walks in Stirling Range National Park.

Mt Trio Walk

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Mt Trio Walk Photo Credit: Parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au

The Mount Trio walk includes three separate peaks that are connected by a plateau. The walk begins with a steep climb but once you reach the saddle between the north and east peaks the level becomes much easier and the views are amazing. You will see panoramic views of Mt Toolbrunup as well as the mountains to the southwest. During spring and early summer, enjoy the picturesque wildflowers in bloom. The walk is a round trip from the picnic area so you can rest there after your walk and even enjoy a picnic lunch.

Bluff Knoll Walk

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Bluff Knoll Walk Photo Credit: Parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au

Bluff Knoll is the tallest mountain in the Stirling Range and it is also the most popular trail because of the 360 degree views from the peak. The trail includes dips down to the creek and then a hike over the mountains with views of the south coast before reaching the summit. The trees and flora you will see on this walk include

  • Eucalypt woodland
  • Banksia
  • Grass Trees

Mount Toolbrunup Walk

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Mount Toolbrunup Walk Photo Credit: Parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au

Mount Toolbrunup is the second highest mountain in the Stirling Range. It is located on the west side of range. Reaching the summit is a hike for experienced hikers with a high fitness level and the agility to ascend steep rocks. Be cautious because the trail from the carpark is much easier and then becomes progressively more challenging and steep. However, those who can make this difficult climb are rewards with 360 degree panoramic views of the western range.

Mount Hassell Walk

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Mount Hassell Walk Photo Credit: Parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au

The walk up Mount Hassell is one of the most popular walks in Stirling Range National Park. It is just east of Mount Toolbrunup. As with that trail, this one starts out easy but gets steeper and more difficult as you ascend the mountain. However, the final push to the summit is not as difficult as you would imagine.  Be very careful if the rocks are wet, they can be slippery. The colours of the wildflowers during season are amazing here.

Mount Magog Walk

Mount Magog is very unique and distinctive with its twin peaks. It is located in the centre of the western set of peaks. The Mount Magog Walk starts from a picnic site with tall wandoo trees. The walk takes you across a creek and then takes trekkers through the open country, thick brush, and then the hike to the summit with rocky outcrops.

Scenic Drives in Stirling Range National Park

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Eastern Lookout in Stirling Range National Park Photo Credit: Parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au

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Western Lookout in Stirling Range National Park Photo Credit: Parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au

Not only are there great bushwalks and hikes in Stirling Range National Park, but there is also a scenic drive. The Stirling Range Drive offers up changing views of the park’s scenery from the Eastern Lookout to the Western Lookout. The roads are mostly unsealed on the 42 km drive but they are graded for two wheel drive vehicles. In addition to the two bookend lookouts, keep your eyes peeled for Red Gum Spring, Bluff Knoll, Central Lookout, and White Gum Flat.

Camping in Stirling Range National Park

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Moingup Springs Campsite Photo Credit: Parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au

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Stirling Range Retreat Photo Credit: StirlingRange.com.au

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Mt Trio Bush Camp and Caravan Park Photo Credit: Parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au

There are 3 campsites in Stirling Range National Park: Moingup Springs, Stirling Range Retreat, and Mt Trio Bush Camping and Caravan Park.

  • Moingup Springs has been a meeting place for more than 100 years and still serves that function but as a campground among the jarrah trees and marri trees. Campground facilities include toilet and barbecue.
  • Stirling Range Retreat offers up air conditioned accommodations in addition to caravan and camping facilities. The couple that runs the retreat also offers eco tours, guided walks and unique wildflower tours.
  • The Mt Trio Bush Camp & Caravan Park is located on a working farm that borders Stirling Range National Park. It offers guests a great base for hiking and exploring the mountains and all of the ground in the National Park. Different types of accommodations are available and they also offer guided walking tours.

Hiring a Car in Albany

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Albany Car Hire Map Photo Credit: Budget.com.au

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Stirling Range National Park Map Photo Credit: Google Maps

Stirling Range National Park is about an hour drive north of Albany. Albany is a on the southern coast of Western Australia. You can hire a car in Albany  or rent a vehicle right at the Albany Airport. Just click on any of the links to get a quick and easy rate quote. Speak with one of our knowledgeable and friendly agents and they can help you pick out the right vehicle for your needs. We have a selection of all-terrain and 4WD vehicles in addition to cars. Hiring a vehicle gives you the freedom to get around on your own schedule without worrying about catching tour buses or paying for taxis. While you are in Western Australia, check out these other travel ideas from our blog:

Make it an Amazing Holiday in Awesome Albany, Western Australia

Esperance and the Southern Coast of Western Australia

Wine, Waves, and Caves of the Margaret River Region

The Pinnacles and Nambung National Park

Perth Road Trips: Rottnest Island and Lancelin

Visiting Perth on Holiday

Free Things to do on Holiday in Perth

Holiday Getaways near Perth and Surrounds

Korung National Park in the Perth Hills

Your Taste Buds will Enjoy the Margaret River Gourmet Escape

Here are our previous blogs on the National Parks and nature parks near Perth:

Part One: National Park Excursions near Perth

Part Two: National Park Excursions near Perth

Part Three: National Park Excursions near Perth

Part Four: Regional Parks near Perth

Part Five: Regional Parks near Perth

Part Six: Marine Parks near Perth Western Australia

Part Seven: Nature Reserves near Perth