You may not associate snorkelling with Sydney, but there is some world class snorkelling right in Sydney that will fulfill your need for adventures with a mask and fins. No need to travel far and wide, clear waters and unique marine life awaits you right off of the coast and beaches of Sydney. Here are seven places you should definitely check out and plan a snorkel and see adventure soon. Continue reading

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+

This is part two of our blog series all about the Bicentennial National Trail. In part one, we covered the northern part of the trail, sections 1 through 6 that take you from the Far North of Queensland in Cooktown to the Queensland and New South Wales Border. If you are into long distance trekking, then you should consider The Bicentennial National Trail for your next holiday adventure. Originally known as the National Horse Trail, the Bicentennial National Trail is a challenging hike stretching over 5,330 km from Cooktown, Queensland through New South Wales, the ACT, and ending in Healesville, Victoria near Melbourne. The trail was originally intended for horses, and is now one of the longest non-motorised trails in the world. It is classified as multi-use, so horses are still used on the trail as well as bicycling and walking. In fact, the entire length of the trail is not yet suitable for hiking and cycling, so use caution and obey all signs. The trail is rugged and passes through the Great Dividing Range, several national parks, private property and wilderness areas. The trail’s concept was developed by legendary Australian bushman, RM WIlliams and the route was first blazed by Danny Seymour in 1972 with his horses named Smokey and Dino and his cattle dog, Bluedog. The Australian Trail Horse Riders Association (ATHRA) was formed that same year, and the group helped to develop a plan to map out the trail from the Far North of Queensland down the eastern seaboard. The trail uses old coach roads, stock routes, brumby tracks, rivers, and fire trails. The trail is separated into 12 sections and there is a Guidebook for each section. You must have the Guidebooks in order to follow the trail. Today, we are continuing south on our journey through sections seven to twelve starting from where we left off at the border between Queensland and New South Wales heading south through New South Wales, the ACT, and into Victoria down to the southern coast. Continue reading

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+

If you are into long distance trekking, then you should consider The Bicentennial National Trail for your next holiday adventure. Originally known as the National Horse Trail, the Bicentennial National Trail is a challenging hike stretching over 5,330 km from Cooktown, Queensland through New South Wales, the ACT, and ending in Healesville, Victoria near Melbourne. The trail was originally intended for horses, and is now one of the longest non-motorised trails in the world. It is classified as multi-use, so horses are still used on the trail as well as bicycling and walking. In fact, the entire length of the trail is not yet suitable for hiking and cycling; so use caution and obey all signs. The trail is rugged and passes through the Great Dividing Range, several national parks, private property and wilderness areas. The trail’s concept was developed by legendary Australian bushman, RM WIlliams and the route was first blazed by Danny Seymour in 1972 with his horses named Smokey and Dino and his cattle dog, Bluedog. The Australian Trail Horse Riders Association (ATHRA) was formed that same year, and the group helped to develop a plan to map out the trail from the Far North of Queensland down the eastern seaboard. The trail uses old coach roads, stock routes, brumby tracks, rivers, and fire trails. The trail is separated into 12 sections and there is a Guidebook for each section. You must have the Guidebooks in order to follow the trail. In part one of our blog coverage today, we will be covering sections one through six beginning in the north at Cooktown. Continue reading

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+

The Three Capes Track is located in Tasmania on the Tasman Peninsula. This is close to the capital city of Hobart in the southeast corner of the island state. It is one of the furthest points south in Australia. The Three Capes Track walk is a multi-day walk. It is a 4 day and 3 night adventure through this rugged and wild land. The beautiful and astonishing landscapes you will see include land in Tasman National Park; and the three capes of the namesake are Cape Pillar, Cape Hauy, and Cape Raoul. The scenery includes tall eucalypt forests, coastal heath, and Australia’s highest sea cliffs. Continue reading

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+

We have been featuring the national parks in the region north of Sydney in New South Wales including the Greater Blue Mountains Area National Parks as well as other national parks in the region.  We featured Berowra Valley National Park, Marramarra National Park, Dharug National Park,  Yengo National Park, Kanangra-Boyd National Park, Nattai National Park, Gardens of Stone National Park, Thirlmere Lakes National Park, and Brisbane Water National Park  Previously, we highlighted several other National Parks in this region including Blue Mountains National Park, Ku-ring-ga National Park, Royal National Park and Wollemi National Park. Continue reading

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+

We previously told you about all of the walking tracks in Brisbane Water National Park in part one and things to do in part two like cycling trails, lookouts and picnic spots.  In part three, we will be highlighting the flora and fauna of the park. It is 11,506 hectares and located 27 km north of Sydney. It takes about 1 ½ hours to drive to the park from Sydney’s CBD. Brisbane Water National Park is located in the Central Coast region of New South Wales. We have been featuring the national parks in the region north of Sydney in New South Wales including the Greater Blue Mountains Area National Parks as well as other national parks in the region.  We featured Berowra Valley National Park, Marramarra National Park, Dharug National Park,  Yengo National Park, Kanangra-Boyd National Park, Nattai National Park, Gardens of Stone National Park, and Thirlmere Lakes National Park. Previously, we highlighted several other National Parks in this region including Blue Mountains National Park, Ku-ring-ga National Park, Royal National Park and Wollemi National Park. There are so many national parks in this region close to Sydney, some are part of the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage-listed area and some are not. Today is our last national park in this region, we are highlighting things to do in Brisbane Water National Park. Visiting a national park helps contribute to their protection and is an excellent way to be able to enjoy the Australian wilderness. Continue reading

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+

Next on our list of National Parks near Sydney is Thirlmere Lakes National Park. It is adjacent to Kanangra-Boyd National Park and is the smallest of all the parks in the Blue Mountains Area at 629 hectares. It is located about 70 km southwest of Sydney and takes about an 1 ½ hours to drive there from Sydney’s CBD. Like the other national parks in our current blog series, this protected park along with seven other national parks all make up the UNESCO World Heritage listed Greater Blue Mountains Area. Thirlmere Lakes National Park is located in the Macarthur region of New South Wales. We have been featuring the national parks in the region north of Sydney in New South Wales including the Greater Blue Mountains Area National Parks as well as other national parks in the region.  We featured Berowra Valley National Park, Marramarra National Park, Dharug National Park,  Yengo National Park, Kanangra-Boyd, National Park, Nattai National Park, and Gardens of Stone National Park. Previously, we highlighted several other National Parks in this region including Blue Mountains National Park, Ku-ring-ga National Park, Royal National Park and Wollemi National Park. There are so many national parks in this region close to Sydney, some are part of the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage-listed area and some are not. Today is our last national park in this region, we are highlighting things to do in Thirlmere Lakes National Park, it is one of the 8 parks that make up the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage-listed Area and makes up part of the Great Dividing Range. Visiting a national park helps contribute to their protection and is an excellent way to be able to enjoy the Australian wilderness. Thirlmere Lakes National Park’s main features are the namesake lakes of the park. They are thought to have formed around 15 million years ago. As a result of the lakes, there is a wide variety of very unusual flora and fauna in Thirlmere Lakes National park. Rare species of plants and animals inhabit the park including the watershield, the grey sedge, the wooly frogsmouth lily, Australiasian bittern, and Latham’s snipe. Rare freshwater sponge can be found in the lakes. The forest surrounding the lakes includes sclerophyll forest, rough-barked apple, sydney peppermint, and red bloodwood. Continue reading

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+

Gardens of Stone National Park is a smaller national park just to the west of Wollemi National Park and north west of Blue Mountains National Park. Of course, when it comes to this region, a smaller national park is still 15,080 hectares! It takes a little less than 3 hours to get here from Sydney. Like the other national parks in our current blog series, this protected park along with seven other national parks all make up the UNESCO World Heritage listed Greater Blue Mountains Area. Gardens of Stone is far west enough to be considered part of the central Tablelands. We have been featuring the national parks in the region north of Sydney in New South Wales including the Greater Blue Mountains Area National Parks as well as other national parks in the region.  We featured Berowra Valley National Park, Marramarra National Park, Dharug National Park,  Yengo National Park, Kanangra-Boyd, National Park, and Nattai National Park. Previously, we highlighted several other National Parks in this region including Blue Mountains National Park, Ku-ring-ga National Park, Royal National Park and Wollemi National Park. There are so many national parks in this region close to Sydney, some are part of the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage-listed area and some are not. Today, we are featuring Gardens of Stone National Park, it is one of the 8 parks that make up the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage-listed Area and makes up part of the Great Dividing Range. Visiting a national park helps contribute to their protection and is an excellent way to be able to enjoy the Australian wilderness. Gardens of Stone National Park gets its name from the natural stone pagodas that are located in the park. Inside the park, the landscape also is made up of dramatic cliffs and canyons, limestone outcrops, karsts, elevated swamps, and some other unusual geological features. Near Gardens of Stone National Park, in addition to Wollemi National Park and Yengo National Park, you can also visit the Newnes State Forest, the Wolgan Valley, and the Wolgan State Forest. The local towns that border the park are Capertee, Ben Bullen, and Glen Davis. Continue reading

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+

Kanangra-Boyd National Park is located just south west of the Blue Mountains. It is just about a 3 hour drive from Sydney and it is a scenic drive through the Blue Mountains to get to this park. It is located 180 km south west of Sydney. This protected park along with seven other national parks all make up the UNESCO World Heritage listed Greater Blue Mountains Area. We have been featuring the national parks in the region north of Sydney in New South Wales including the Greater Blue Mountains Area National Parks as well as other national parks in the region.  We featured Berowra Valley National Park, Marramarra National Park, and Dharug National Park  and Yengo National Park. Previously, we highlighted several other National Parks in this region including Blue Mountains National Park, Ku-ring-ga National Park, Royal National Park and Wollemi National Park.  Today, we are featuring Kanangra-Boyd National Park, which is one of the larger national parks in the region at 68,660 hectares. It forms part of the Great Dividing Range and housed within the borders of this national park are some amazing features including three waterfall systems, karst caves, Kanangra Walls, Mount Colong, and Thurat Spires. Continue reading

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+

Last week we shared some of our sizzling hot deals that are heating up for summer. Today we have the rest of November’s deals to show you. Find all of this month’s discount codes, special offers, and details on our website: Budget.com.au. You can be sure that there is a great price or special pricing offer available at almost every Budget location in all states in Australia. Some of these special offers are regional and some discounts are available throughout Australia and some are regional or in certain states or territories. Last week, we featured The special deals we have for you this month include: 7th Day Rental Free in Darwin, Relocation Special from Melbourne to Sydney, 5th day free at Kangaroo Island, $10 off for ABN Holders, 4th day free,  3rd weekend day free, and Budget Car Rental deals that are available at your fingertips through the new Budget app. Today, we have even more savings on your car rental in Australia including: Continue reading

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+